Friday, June 11, 2010

welcome to storm season

We had a little excitement in the 'hood the other day/evening. We were at WalMart picking up food for a diocesan clergy and family picnic we're hosting tomorrow when a downpour hit. By the time we emerged with our load of food the storm had passed, but not before doing some real damage in our part of town. Oblivious to what had taken place while on our errand, turning into our neighborhood we couldn't help but notice some downed tree limbs in a few yards. We even drove around the block to take a better look at a large limb that had fallen in the back yard of a neighbor.

Then we turned the corner onto the street from which we turn onto our street. Utility trucks were positioned and at work addressing a fractured telephone pole, the victim of an uprooted tree across the street (photo, above). We were leery of what we would find when we got to our house. We were lucky that one small, live branch was across the walk to our door, and the debris of dead and rotted branches dotted the lawn. The worst we suffered was the loss of power.
Around the neighborhood the picture was less rosy. Directly across the street our neighbor, among many others on surrounding streets, lost a portion of their Bradford Pear tree. Bradford Pears, if not pruned and maintained, become weakened by undesirable suckers, and are vulnerable as they age to storms and strong winds. The photo above is typical of the scene on all of the streets around us.
In spite of the damage, it was remarkable to see how quickly those suffering loss were out dragging branches to the curb. And not just the victims of the storm. A trio of neighborhood men armed with chain saws and other equipment went from yard to yard lending aid. They cut through broken trunks to release downed limbs, and cut large limbs into smaller, manageable pieces. In the meantime neighbors helped neighbors, loading the backs of pick-ups with masses of branches, driving them from back yards to street frontage and then unloading them along the street where the city would come by and run them through the mulcher.

Sadly, a house three blocks away was struck by lightning and was immediately consumed by flames. The good news is that this is a place where neighbors DO help neighbors, and the response to mess and disaster is quick and productive. In areas of Nashville devastated by flooding five weeks ago the volunteer effort there continues apace, with no signs of abating. Is it any wonder that we are proud in these parts to proclaim that We Are Nashville?

6 comments:

KimQuiltz said...

No surprise at all! Beautiful, inspiring story, Anne.

Jayne said...

The storms up that way have simply been fierce this season. Glad no one was injured. Neighbors helping neighbors... it's a wonderful thing.

Mompriest said...

I experienced this one too, it is so startling. Glad your neighbors are so kind to one another.

Kip said...

We sure are having strange weather everywhere this year. So glad your house wasn't damaged Anne. So nice to hear about neighbors helping out.

The Bug said...

Scary! But glad you weren't affected. Stories like this about people helping give me hope...

Jules said...

Wow...that was some storm. Glad you are all safe. love ya,

There was an error in this gadget

LinkWithin

Related Posts with Thumbnails